As COVID-19 continues to impact the world, 3D printing has emerged as a way to provide supplies that the medical community needs drastically. Makers and designers in the 3D printing community responded in force to the global crisis by volunteering their respective skills and easing pressure on the supply chains.

Shayla Anthony, CBRE Digital and Technology Manager, is helping to support the manufacture of personal protective equipment (PPE) and other necessary items in short supply. She's using open source designs to 3D print face shields, face masks, mask extenders, bias tape makers and other needed items for front-line workers in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, area.

Shayla is currently printing these items on seven 3D printers in her home, printing 24/7 to keep up with the number of requests. Some of the printed items have been donated to nurses and staff members at Forbes Hospital ER and other area nursing and senior care facilities, first responders and her local volunteer fire department.

Even though she doesn't sew, Shayla also joined a local sewing community, Sewing for Angels (a partner of the nonprofit Pittsburgh Gateways Corporation) to provide 3D printed bias tape makers and mask folding devices. These tools allow the group to continue to make masks for the community. Bias tape makers are used as an alternative material for straps, due to the shortage of elastic.

CBRE coworkers, friends, family and the general Pittsburgh community have all offered donations to help Shayla purchase the additional supplies needed to continue to print everything for free for those in need. To see Shayla's printers in action, watch this video.
In every corner of the world, our people are supporting local communities, selflessly assisting others, and helping clients and colleagues acutely affected by COVID-19. We're sharing those stories.
Together We Are Strongest. We are #CBREUnited.
In every corner of the world, our people are supporting local communities, selflessly assisting others, and helping clients and colleagues acutely affected by COVID-19. We're sharing those stories.